New Old Photos—Arriving in China, 1981

Just this week we got several of my husband Gauss’s slides from our time in China in 1981-82 digitized. Here’s a look back to life in the slow lane.

The first two photos are of our trip from Guangzhou to Xi’an. To read the story behind them, revisit this early post: White Rabbit

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Patti in the waiting room of the Guangzhou airport, ready to leave for Xi’an, July 1981. Note rattan furniture (it was HOT) and ashtray. Photo © Gauss Rescigno.

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Getting back on the plane at Changsha airport. It was dinnertime and they didn’t serve food in flight, so we landed, everyone got off and walked to a dining room, ate, and got back on. Nobody left the flight or joined the flight at this stop. It was just like the Greyhound bus pulling off the interstate to a Hardee’s to eat. Photo ©Gauss Rescigno.

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Writing on the balcony of our apartment at Jiaotong University, August 1981. I’m could be composing teaching materials, writing in my diary, writing a letter home, or correcting someone’s homework. Photo ©Gauss Rescigno.

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Lunch break with students at the hot springs at Lintong, one of our early field trips. Left to right: Arthur, Martin, Michael, Patti, Aaron Li. Photo ©Gauss Rescigno.

I’ll be adding more photos as they become available, so check back in a week or two.

Quiet City

August, 1981

I was surprised as the plane began to descend. I saw no cues that we were anywhere near a city: no street lights in sight, no ribbon highways of white headlights and red tail lights, no neon signs. Shouldn’t we be in the city of Xi’an? What was going on? Only when we got within feet of the ground could I see a string of lights casting a weak glow on the runway. It was 9:00 p.m.

After landing, we walked out into cool, misty air and then into a building that made me think of a small-town armory, bare and lit with naked fluorescent tubes. Like other “nice” places we’d seen during our first week in China, the airport looked like a worn out version of a pretty place, with high ceilings, fancy moldings and unused decorative light fixtures. It was furnished with crinkly brown vinyl sofas. Papers, apple cores and other refuse littered the floor. Chairman Mao smiled down from a prominent place. We had finally arrived in the city that would be our home for the next year.

A posse consisting of the university president, a driver, and two handlers from the Foreign Affairs office had driven out in a single car to greet us. Counting Gauss and me—and the handler dispatched to Guangzhou to fetch us—we now totaled seven. Incredibly, since we were going to one of China’s leading technical universities, nobody had considered the logistics. There was not enough room in the vehicle to take us back to the campus. At this time of night, and this far from town, there were no taxis. We would have to make the trip in installments.

Gauss and I waited for another hour in the shabby terminal with half our luggage until the car returned with only a driver and one handler. We had left Minnesota weeks ago, driven across the United States, flown across the Pacific, and spent several days in Hong Kong and Guangzhou. The day’s flight from southern China had been delayed several hours, and by now we were dead tired and ready to finally be getting to our new “home.”

Crammed in the thickly upholstered back seat of a tubby little car reminiscent of a relic from my childhood, we bumped down the pitch-black streets with the headlights off. The driver periodically flashed them on for a second or two as if to get a quick mental picture of what was ahead, and then shut them off again. We were too tired to ask why, and in any event, we had seen much that puzzled us. There were more questions to ask than there was time to answer them. We seemed to be driving through a ghost town: the roads were devoid of pedestrians and any other vehicles, and we were unable to see beyond the ten-foot walls that lined the boulevard. I was too puzzled to find this alarming or worrisome. Instead, I gulped in snatches of visual information when I could.

Occasionally in the distance, I saw a single bulb casting a circle of light in the middle of an intersection, the adjacent streets swallowed by the darkness. Our car took several turns, the last one through an opening in one of the high walls. Finally I could see low brick apartment buildings, a few windows glowing dimly. The car slowed to a crawl and pulled up onto the dirt behind one of them.